Cave rescue restores faith in mankind..

Cave rescue restores faith in mankind..

A few weeks ago, 12 boys went to explore a cave in Thailand along with their coach.

At the time, they never imagined that what would have been a boys’ day out would become a drama watched by an anxious world, saturated with prayers from all faiths.

But that’s exactly what it became.

As news stations around the world waited for news with bated breath and experts came together to look for ways to get the trapped boys and their coach to safety, it brought to light the heroism of Thai special forces and countless volunteers from specialised military operations such as SEALS from all over the world.

Amidst the anguish of mothers and families, only too familiar to mothers everywhere who wait anxiously for their children to return home from trips, excursions and the like, there was something else that struck me.

It was the power of humanity that assures me that yes, there is hope for mankind.

Love and compassion is not dead as the world or its media would like us to believe. For a moment frozen in time, it was love in action. The men leading the rescue were fathers themselves ; this mission was personal.

The cave rescue showed the world that despite the gloomy predictions, there is enough reason for our children to look forward to kindness and mercy in the world.

Not only because so many experts came together to put their lives on the line in wading into a treacherous cave to rescue boys they have never seen or known ; also because the story brought the world into a tight circle of caring – across social media platforms, reaching the furthest places and beyond.

From Elon Musk to the prayer warriors of your corner church, the world stood together, wanting nothing but the best for the trapped boys and their coach. It was a beautiful moment history would record for the next generations to see that humanity can be a beautiful thing, Still.

In an age when a singular preoccupation with the smartphone often means we miss tender moments that connect us together, the rescue meant something to all of us. It restored our faith in humanity – as a community, united through a thin but powerful line of technology that enabled each of us to connect with the heroes on the ground in Thailand, celebrated the rescue as never before.

It was not just the rescue effort but the commitment undertaken with an iron resolve to ensure that there would be no looking back. From the determined Thai SEALS one of whom sacrificed his life towards setting the children free, to the British and American SEALs and other cave diving specialists who gathered at the mouth of the cave to lend their shoulders to the effort.

Thailand was not alone. The world was with them, united by more than just a popular effort, one that touched every mother’s heart, one that resonated with people everywhere. From Facebook updates to prayers seeking divine intervention, people all over the world stood together in wishing nothing but the best outcome of a chaotic situation.

And there we find a cause for celebration – not only because as I write this, the boys have been rescued and the heroes quietly slipping away back into their lives. But also because for a moment frozen in time, humanity came together in one singular effort that cut across national, geographical, political, ethnic and religious borders.

Tonight my children can sleep tight in knowing that kindness is very much alive out there somewhere ; and when needed, it can flow right in.

 

 

 

 

 

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“I remember distinctly meeting this little girl who was very young, probably about seven or eight, and she was rocking backwards and forwards staring at the wall, and tears streaming down her face because she had been brutally raped multiple times, you couldn’t talk to her, you couldn’t touch her. I felt absolutely helpless, I didn’t know what to do for her.”-
Those stark words were spoken by the Hollywood superstar Angelina Jolie,appearing before the British parliament on the horrendous use of rape by ISIS in conflict as a weapon. I have heard of the atrocities and seen the pictures but Jolie’s words sank in deep – I had just sent off my eight year old little girl to school. I couldn’t even bring myself to read the words in total – how low could a human being sink in order to desire the rape of a child..while it is unthinkable to many of us, to the ISIS, it is merely one of the tactics they use to shock the world and pursue their agenda.

Robbing a child of his or her childhood by whatever means, in my book, amounts to a crime as worse as taking a life. The little girl Jolie saw, violated in mind and body, rocking back and forth, staring at a wall, tears streaming down her face has suffered more trauma than we can possibly imagine. For some of them, the worse memories are watching their friends and sisters bargained over and sold as sex slaves.

These children would never know the blissful childhood routines most children take for granted. Traumatized and disoriented for the rest of their lives, they will not be able to experience life in totality. As much as they need help in relocating and rebuilding, the psychological damage unleashed on them would require professional support and guidance.

As at April this year, TIME reported that over 3,000 girls, mostly from Christian minority and Yezidi community, were being held as sex slaves , a practice defended by the ISIS despite worldwide condemnation. A girl who escaped told of the brutality of rape, with girls as young as 8 being raped repeatedly by ISIS gangs who would not hesitate to hit them violently. Many girls die and others survive scarred for life. Where their destiny lies, no one can tell.

In the meantime, are we doing enough to at least shock the world into realising that these are someone’s daughters and sisters that are being violated without any regard for them? Are we doing enough in spreading the word? Can condemnation of the manner in which ISIS is using their faith to justify the horrendous sexual violence come from within the Moslem community?

We live in a world no longer shocked by what it hears and sees – we have become numb to pain and suffering of others. As these girls continue to suffer more psychological damage than even physical, can we do our little bit and share the word? Can we in our own little ways replicate what Angelina Jolie is doing.

Let’s join hands on social media – let’s create awareness of the fate of girls just like our daughters, girls who should be smiling and laughing, going to school and singing the Frozen theme song.

“Societies have a peculiar way of relating, or more accurately non-relating, to rape maybe because it is so vicious, they choose to live in denial about it.”

Aysha Taryam