Mozart’s sister was equally talented and the point is…

Mozart’s sister was equally talented and the point is…

Apparently, Mozart’s sister was as talented as the gifted composer. And it seems she had to give up music in order to find a husband and settle down. Now to the naked eye, there’s nothing wrong with this – it was the expected thing to do at the time. A woman back then had to find a husband at a certain age in order to survive. Not that things are much different today although we would have to hold our tongues to be politically correct. Any woman in her late thirties and unmarried, can hear her biological clock ticking loud and clear. But that’s not the topic today.

Mozart’s sister’s legacy is being revived, some say, to fulfill the feminist agenda. Among other things they want you to consider – letting women fight on front lines and screaming injustice every time a man mouthes what is deemed to be a sexist joke. Now, for every politically correct gender agenda, there are perfectly justifiable battles women are fighting elsewhere in the world – Saudi women cannot drive or cannot complain against their husbands. Women in India are fighting rape and male attitudes against women. Elsewhere in Africa, women are fighting to avoid genital mutilation. Every battle a valid one.

Which is why we must be careful not to trivialize the victories we have had, the victories that must be won. Equality is not about matching the men physically and challenging them to dare to go to war with women as comrades but about being confident in who we are, no matter what roles we may be called upon in life to play.

It does trivialize the importance of gender issues when we choose to cry mayhem over every time some man in his seventies or sixties, belonging to a generation when sexist jokes were pretty much ok, make one. It does bring down our rallying call for justice a peg or two when we raise the battle cry over women who had no other choice but to live as per the norms of her day. It is not about the sisterhood – it is about gaining enough respect and recognition to warrant a push for greater, much needed change. Change that will be taken seriously because it is needed for the millions of women placed in much less fortunate circumstances. Women who are fighting battles everyday to keep their families together, their children fed and themselves safe.

Even in the developed world, women face many discrimination issues – over pay, career prospects and opportunities. The glass ceiling is very much there even though we may not always see it.

So the next time media runs a story that probably will be the next great feminist story, we need to be able to assure ourselves that sisterhood is not about being politically correct in a world clearly gone mad, beyond all borders with the PC agenda.

It is about being able to draw attention to the issues of discrimination against women all over the world. It is being able to identify the real issues from the noise. And be able to stand up and be counted for it.

Cherish the moment…

Cherish the moment…

So many tragedies, so many tears – from the shooting in Oregon to the flooding in South Carolina grabbing headlines the same week…ISIS is still wreaking havoc in the Middle East and at home, we still haven’t established who killed little Seya..it’s a dark world and it is easy to drown in all in sorrow, in one big heap..

But we are a people of hope…I speak as a Christian who believe that my Redeemer lives..I also speak as a mother and a wife and I believe that we must be able to cultivate our moments that empower us to overcome the sadness, the bitter world around us. It is so easy to go along with the flow and feel the negative vibes but we must swim upstream.

Many of us get through the day absorbed in what we do – often, our work. We connect to the world on our computers and smart phones and it becomes so easy to be wrapped up in our own little worlds. Can we step aside and connect with those around us? Can we spend a moment to cherish with our children, aging parents, a lonely co-worker, a neighbour who recently lost a loved one? Could we reach out to other people and maybe take some of the loneliness, the anger, the frustrations away?

It is the moments spent in the company of others that enrich our souls – that make us who we are.Too many of us hide behind our phones or our lap tops as we connect and entertain ourselves ; it is important to switch off the devices and switch on what makes us who we are – the human connections that enrich us.

Dinner table conversation is a good place to start. Teach the children to connect to one another – they are increasingly connected to devices too and sometimes, we are guilty of using the very devices as babysitters. Two year olds are entertained by iPads and by five, they don’t need company, they’ve got it all together, entertaining themselves.

Cherish the moment. Get off the computer and take your daughter or son to a walk in the park. Let not the darkness around us get in. We can light a candle in our own lives – it can and must come from us.

Just last week, we visited some of my husband’s relatives in the country – the beautiful surroundings of Dodanduwa, Hikkaduwa. The old house had been beautifully restored and the sprawling garden and a cool well was a treat to behold. Just sitting in the old verandah, doing nothing but listening to the sounds of nature, laughing and catching up with a few, many such a difference in our lives that day. It gave me a memory to cherish. I can still close my eyes and see in my mind’s eyes the fireflies gathering as the night fell, the sunset slowly coming over the greenery of many hues.

Let us not let a troubled world trouble us too. We can and must take refuge in what we do everyday -find the time to cherish moments spentwith each other.

Casting the first stone…

Casting the first stone…

In the aftermath of one of the most despicable crimes against humanity committed against little Seya, we have entered the next phase and justifiably so. We must find the perpetrator and if possible, hang him. Some want to give him over to a mob while others want ISIS style execution. Given the heinous  nature of the crime, by all means yes. But if only we have the right man.

It was more a case of venting out our outrage, our righteous anger that burns against a man whose deprived mind was capable of doing things that a normal human being would not even consider.  And rightly so too ; every mother, every father, every one else wanted a part of seeking justice for Seya.

Unfortunately, the law enforcement officers still haven’t been able to find the man. The father was first considered a suspect and then the grandfather was a likely candidate too. As social media forums flowed with hate, the focus then shifted to a 17 year old who was said to be in possession of porn on his computer. But, as I write this, no proper culprit is found. Yet, in our pursuit for justice we as a nation have already judged and passed sentence on people who have not had anything to do with the crime.

As absurd as it may sound to some, one wrong doesn’t make another right. Every man present that night in Seya’s neighbourhood is not, must not be a suspect. The job of the law enforcement is to seek out the real killer ; speculation can only ruin life for by standers such as the girl’s father, grandfather or the 17 year old boy whose future, by now, probably looks quite bleak just by the virtue of his arrest on suspicion.

Hunting killers is a painstaking business – some police officers have taken years to follow in the trail of perpetrators before pouncing on them. Nazis who killed women, men and children in cold blood are still being hunted down and persecuted despite the fact that many of them are now in their nineties.

Sometimes, striving for swift justice to ease our own pain is not enough. Neither is assuring ourselves that someone, anyone must be caught and brought before justice. We must be able to wait upon justice, seeking the actual killer and not someone who may have done it or who could have done it. It will then become a mere courtroom drama and lose steam down the line, causing many to lose faith in a system of justice we want to believe still works, despite all the flaws.

Seya and the many other little girls and boys being abused, groped and violated, want us to deliver the kind of justice that doesn’t make sensational news on media just so that we can rejoice for the wrong reasons. They, I’m sure, if they could speak, would want us to act with wisdom , they would want us to outsmart the killer and the Paedophile and call their bluff.

They would want us to develop a system that would not just bring one killer to book but also plug the holes where more would-be perpetrators can score. They would want us to come together as a society to build a safe environment for children as much as we can. They would ask us what lessons we learnt from their stories so that other children can be spared the misery.

We owe them that much. Not just to cry out for anyone’s blood but to make sure, with our heads as well with our hearts, to ensure that we can find the killer using right evidence and not heresy.  That we are capable of rising above emotion and deal with it as a responsible, civilized society that can unlearn wrong perceptions and learn the lessons the little angels are teaching from up there.

In the meantime, let’s do what we can do – become better , more vigilant mothers and fathers, aunts and uncles, brothers and sisters so that in our own way, we can prevent another child from being abused.

We owe it to us and our children- and to Seya.

“I remember distinctly meeting this little girl who was very young, probably about seven or eight, and she was rocking backwards and forwards staring at the wall, and tears streaming down her face because she had been brutally raped multiple times, you couldn’t talk to her, you couldn’t touch her. I felt absolutely helpless, I didn’t know what to do for her.”-
Those stark words were spoken by the Hollywood superstar Angelina Jolie,appearing before the British parliament on the horrendous use of rape by ISIS in conflict as a weapon. I have heard of the atrocities and seen the pictures but Jolie’s words sank in deep – I had just sent off my eight year old little girl to school. I couldn’t even bring myself to read the words in total – how low could a human being sink in order to desire the rape of a child..while it is unthinkable to many of us, to the ISIS, it is merely one of the tactics they use to shock the world and pursue their agenda.

Robbing a child of his or her childhood by whatever means, in my book, amounts to a crime as worse as taking a life. The little girl Jolie saw, violated in mind and body, rocking back and forth, staring at a wall, tears streaming down her face has suffered more trauma than we can possibly imagine. For some of them, the worse memories are watching their friends and sisters bargained over and sold as sex slaves.

These children would never know the blissful childhood routines most children take for granted. Traumatized and disoriented for the rest of their lives, they will not be able to experience life in totality. As much as they need help in relocating and rebuilding, the psychological damage unleashed on them would require professional support and guidance.

As at April this year, TIME reported that over 3,000 girls, mostly from Christian minority and Yezidi community, were being held as sex slaves , a practice defended by the ISIS despite worldwide condemnation. A girl who escaped told of the brutality of rape, with girls as young as 8 being raped repeatedly by ISIS gangs who would not hesitate to hit them violently. Many girls die and others survive scarred for life. Where their destiny lies, no one can tell.

In the meantime, are we doing enough to at least shock the world into realising that these are someone’s daughters and sisters that are being violated without any regard for them? Are we doing enough in spreading the word? Can condemnation of the manner in which ISIS is using their faith to justify the horrendous sexual violence come from within the Moslem community?

We live in a world no longer shocked by what it hears and sees – we have become numb to pain and suffering of others. As these girls continue to suffer more psychological damage than even physical, can we do our little bit and share the word? Can we in our own little ways replicate what Angelina Jolie is doing.

Let’s join hands on social media – let’s create awareness of the fate of girls just like our daughters, girls who should be smiling and laughing, going to school and singing the Frozen theme song.

“Societies have a peculiar way of relating, or more accurately non-relating, to rape maybe because it is so vicious, they choose to live in denial about it.”

Aysha Taryam

RIP little one – may yours be the last such death that will haunt our world.

RIP little one – may yours be the last such death that will haunt our world.

The picture of the little Kurdish boy’s lifeless body, washed up on the beach in Turkey, should have been enough to register the hopelessness, the futility of the migrant crisis going on as I write this, in Europe. It was a symbol in many ways – the parent in us mourned the boy’s sad fate and hearts were touched. He was too young to be thus swept away in a torrent of tragedy. Yet, powerful as his picture is, the tragedy underlying the refugee influx is neither fully grasped nor serious enough to warrant the attention of a world occupied with everything trending on line.

His little feet would have lost their grip on a boat jammed with people – he and his brother were not wearing life vests. They didn’t have a chance of surviving out at sea ; they escaped from a nightmare on land only to be swallowed up by the waters. As tragic as it is, how can we try to make sense of it all?

Thousands of migrants are jamming the entry points into Europe ; the despair written on their faces may not tell the whole story. As much as the world wants to identify with it, as much as the world is dismayed by it, there are other things to consider, saner counsel that must prevail. As the ISIS seeks to throttle any civilization left in the ancient heartlands of the Middle East, how is the world reacting? When you want to stop the flow of water, you plug the leak. Then only will you choose to deal with the overflow. Are we plugging the leak that has led to millions of people leaving Syria on a treacherous journey in search of a better life? Is the world doing enough to make sure those people can be kept in their own shores and taken care of?

There are more questions here than answers. Is the desperation written on their faces one that stems from losing their homes or from wanting to simply migrate to a better life? How would we know and how can we identify the true and genuine asylum seeker from the economic migrants? How would we know who is an ISIS sympathizer and who isn’t, in that maddening influx of young men, boys and adolescents cramming railways and walking on rail tracks in countries choked up with a refugee influx, from Greece to Hungary?

We in Sri Lanka have dealt with such issues before – you might say we have hindsight into such problems. When civil war broke out in Sri Lanka with the terror group that held the record of being the world’s deadliest before ISIS came along, the LTTE which perfected the art of suicide bombings , there were asylum seekers from war torn areas who went in search of a better life to Europe, the US and Australia ; as time went by, during the thirty years the war lasted, the refugees gradually became economic ones although their stories may have been believable in many ways. Then the war ended in 2009 and the world woke up to the reality that they could indeed go home. A few in reality, did.

The human smuggling rings are smarter than the world’s law enforcement authorities, a fact that many are not able to grasp. Until a year ago, the well organized gangs kept a lucrative business of smuggling people to Australia from the shores of Sri Lanka. The Australian Government was swift in dealing with this outflow ; today, a few would dare to try the boat journey through the dark seas into Australian waters.

Until and unless the world and its police forces choose to deal with the satanic rings of human smugglers, whose profits lie in exploiting other people’s misery, we would continue to see the horrors of children dying and families daring to cross through some of the world’s dangerous routes.

As sad as it all seems, as hopeless as it all seems, it can and must be dealt with. Not because we feel guilty about our safety nets that are not available to those unfortunate families but because we need to stand up to the evil of humans being treated and transported like goods. All in the name of better lives.

I am choosing not to feel guilty although the picture of that child moves me to tears – I am choosing to argue that the world and the powers of US, Europe, Middle East, Asia and the UN must step in to deal with the well organized criminals.

Until then, RIP little one. Just being shocked and saddened at your death nor sharing your picture on social media, will help you and others like you. We as the world must take action.

May yours be the last such death that will haunt our world.

Go Set a Watchman – Harper Lee’s book on race tells us many things…

Go Set a Watchman – Harper Lee’s book on race tells us many things…

To Kill a Mockingbird was a childhood treasure – the book was in my father’s library ever since I could remember and was one of his favourites. Among his treasure trove of Somerset Maugham, Ernest Hemingway, Oscar Wilde and Cornelius Ryan, among others, Harper Lee’s classic took pride of place. The movie captured my imagination no less – my father was a great fan of Gregory Peck, who played Atticus Finch to perfection. Growing up in the midst of books – his gift to me was his love of reading and writing, he did both until his death in 2013 profusely – reading came as naturally as breathing. Even today, especially today, when less and less people read, the lure of a good book beats the glamour of the internet any day.

When I read about Harper Lee’s long lost and finally found book Go Set a Watchman, I wasn’t sure how it would turn out to be. The reviews were hesitant, given the content ; I found the book on a recent visit to Singapore – there was a banded offer on sale that combined both the books. With a retro cover that shows a train heading deep into the rural American South, the book felt a lot like going back in time. On all fronts, it seems.

Harper Lee is clearly a writer’s writer. The usage of words, the language is so vivid, you savour every sentence that is so beautifully crafted. I could live with the references to race in the book – it comes from a different era, a different time. It does not have to be politically correct but it has a story to tell, which, under the circumstances, made sense for the people of the time. A story that may seem stark and darker than we would like it to be, but there it is narrating and presenting a picture as it was during those days, in the deep rural South of the US.

Harper Lee’s writings cascade, much like the mighty Mississippi, in an ebb and a flow, making the writer in me want to re-read passages that are so beautifully captured. In your mind’s eye, you can see Jean Louise drive into town, play with her brother Jem and friend Hank under the chinaberry tree and the drinks on the patio on a hot summer’s day ; it was a world without iPods and Internet and you are held with awe with the way in which kids kept themselves occupied. You can understand her dismay at the courthouse as she watches her father take part in that dreaded meeting – and her reaction.

Yet for all its old world rhetoric, Harper Lee’s frank and no nonsense narrative asks a lot of today’s society that is governed by the principles of justice and equality. It also makes a sort of an inward looking plea, that makes you want to pause and think. Jean Louise might be a rebel and shocked at the Southern way of doing things well into the 20th century but there are many moments when you desperately want to see her deal with it and move on.

From another perspective,  there are other sides to the woman that Harper Lee so intricately presents, ones that you want to capture. One that struck me was her inability to accept another point of view, whether right or wrong. Sometimes we are like that too. We are too busy being right that we forget right or wrong, others may have various view points that at least should be listened to. There was a lot of that in the two elections we in Sri Lanka just concluded – so much of one sided arguments, whether right or wrong, cannot prevail. There should be room in an ideal world, for all sides.

But then, we don’t read fiction for lessons in race or race relations or to learn about the importance of being politically correct. There’s an earful of that everyday on media , especially in relation to shootings and protests. We read fiction to enjoy a good book and to remind ourselves that nothing is more enjoyable than a well written good book. Any day.

Kumar Sangakkara’s legacy …

Kumar Sangakkara’s legacy …

I am not exactly a cricket fan although Sri Lanka rising like we did on Indian Independence Day, breaking through the impossible to the possible, does get me interested. But watching Kumar Sangakkara, ever the gentleman, ever a true Trinitian who personifies everything about that great school in the hills, make a very poignant farewell speech, was one of those moments which will for certain stay etched in our memories, for all of us as Sri Lankans.

Many of us, if not all of us, will always remember where we were when we heard his words – my husband and I listened to his speech on Facebook, sitting in the quietness of our Holiday Inn City Centre room in Singapore. Everything stopped for a brief moment as we took in his words – and I am not ashamed to say we both found ourselves teary eyed.

His last speech on the turf took me back to one of the most famous speeches that truly defined Kumar Sangakkara the cricketer. We all know what that speech is and what features it raffled among the idiots who simply could neither decipher the true meaning of his words nor be in possession of the capacity to do so.

For my generation and happily for my son’s, Kumar will always be the finest Sri Lankan who rose above the pettiness that has become a sad habit of this country and its people. He rose above the insecurity, the jealousy, the small mindedness, the prejudice and above all, the tendency to condemn that seem to plague many of us. He stood tall with his fellow Lankans and fellow cricketers all together, all as one. In rising higher, not just on the cricket pitch but outside it as well, he became the icon of hope that we lacked.

He flickered and lit a thousand lights in the minds of my son’s generation of Lankans. His command of the Queen’s language , his ability to articulate and his capacity to stand shoulder to shoulder with the world’s finest cricketers, truly lifted him up to great heights, higher than any Lankan cricketer before him. And needless to say, it makes us proud ; not in a snobbish kind of way but in a way that assures the rest of the civilized world that no matter how tarnished our name as a nation may have been once upon a time, we are still one of the finest civilizations on earth. Kumar Sangakkara’s behaviour has been impeccable both on and off the field – he, one could truly say, reflected the 2,000 year old heritage the un-civilised politicos love to throw around to fool voters. He personified the Lankan spirit, the Lankan talent, the Lankanness of open homes, smiles of welcome and gratitude.

Kumar brought home the importance of values to the young generation as he gave his farewell speech.  He was grateful to his parents, his school, his coaches, his family and everyone else who contributed towards his success. He humbly acknowledged  their contribution and was thankful for it. In doing so, he sent a powerful signal to the wired generation of today. If he could be thankful , so could they.

Kumar Sangakkara, to my mind, has never been seen or heard to shout it out, engage in brazen acts some sportsmen seem to specialise in – neither does he give attitude, a favourite past time of the famous and the brat pack. He is a credit to his parents who raised him and a symbol of finesse to all. Gossip media has not been able to go after him – there’s been no need to. He has always been a class, clean act to follow.

Thank you Kumar for all that you did for Sri Lanka – you are a Sri Lankan icon the world recognises and admires…if we lost credibility on the world stage for one reason or another, if we are dejected when our passports are scrutinized at international airports, if we feel ashamed when the Australian government had to sponsor advertisements on local TV advising us not to come there in boats, if we felt violated to watch absolute mutts masquerade as diplomats on the world stage, we could always point you to them. There is the one true Sri Lankan who can stand up there – this country nurtured him and despite the negatives, it does and will nurture a thousand other Sangakkaras.

What the General Election meant for us as a nation…

What the General Election meant for us as a nation…

It is The Day After.

It’s the day after the General Election. Just a few months ago, I remember waking up on the morning of the 09th January, with a feeling that would always stay etched in my mind. I was free, my family was free, my country was free. From dictatorship and a mad man’s grip. But the nightmare wasn’t really over , bits and pieces kept wanting to take Sri Lanka back by force, if necessary, to those stifling times.

All of which finally ended yesterday. At the ballot box. When millions of Sri Lankans chose to go the polls to elect the best among them, the most deserving, not in terms of adoration and popularity but in terms of making Sri Lanka the kind of place we want to live and thrive in ; one in which our children can live well and be content. I think the word is content – if you are content with your life, you have little to grumble about. Oh, yes, we had a lot to grumble about – not the beautifully paved roads and the gleaming shopping malls where most were window shoppers but the quagmire underneath those facades – one that was rotting with nepotism, vulgarity, mass murder and big time financial misconduct.

So what did it all mean, the election, in which the rogues went on parade once again, seeking votes from the poor and the vulnerable and surprisingly, even from the so called learned who could sadly be labelled the ‘educated but unlearned’. The few good men, if they could be thus called, found the manape pore a tough one but they persisted. I can honestly be glad that I voted for three honest men who contested. In the end, as they say, it is between you and God – you must be honest to your own self not only because you can then sleep well at night but also because it feels right to do so.

This election was unique because it involved the people. From a high octane social media overdrive that saw some of us virtually engaged round the clock, to one to one election campaigning, the people relished the role they played. As never before, Sri Lankans engaged the politicians with questions, queries and lagging doubts. Admittedly, as in the Presidential Election, social media played a key role in giving us voters that platform. Some of the contestants forgot that the ship of voter amnesia had sailed. In the era of smart phones and internet, every word uttered and every promise given, every insult to public intelligence, has been captured and could be plastered all over the web in a matter of minutes. Those who understood the power of voter capacity, did well to play it wise.

So where are we now? We are facing the prospects of a new Sri Lanka not just on economic terms. We face a new Sri Lanka on new terms of engagement. The government will be watched by a populace who are no longer afraid nor incapable of questioning those who are not doing their job. The rogues will be noted and called out. For the first time perhaps in the history of Sri Lankan politics, we have accountability as a key factor present in the new parliament. They will need to keep their promises because we will be monitoring them as the people who voted them in.

We need to stay connected the way we have done during the election – keep playing the role of the engaged active citizen..the citizen journalist…the vigilant..because we are dealing after all, with professional politicians to whom cat and mouse games are easy…our task as citizens is not done..will not be done until this country becomes the kind of place all of us can thrive in..

It is an exciting time to live in – these are indeed life changing times. Someday, we can tell our children and grand children, we remember the great change. The change that heralded in the new Sri Lanka…

Are you a woman voting for a female politician? Ask her what her plans for you are..

Are you a woman voting for a female politician? Ask her what her plans for you are..

As a woman who believes in empowering of all women, it is always wonderful to see so many women contesting the General Election this time. All parties have women on their ranks – the UNP is fielding some old and some new faces and so does the JVP. The UPFA too has women on board. As in other countries, women seeking the vote of other women, must be ideally be able to answer the questions we female voters would have.

Other than seeing their faces smiling down on cut outs, ads and leaflets, it would be wonderful to hear these ladies spell out specific plans they have formulated for the women of Sri Lanka. They do play a key role in the national political stage – but I as a woman need specifics and I’m sure so do other women. Can they address those issues and assure us of the kind of change they can bring?

Just addressing women’s issues would amount to lip service – can they go beyond it and promise change for women when they do get elected? Or they, as before, would put women’s issues on the back burner once elected, as we have seen many a time before, and let them be there?

Sri Lankan women have burning issues. From reliable child care to domestic violence, from supporting entrepreneurship at home so that they can bring in an additional income while taking care of the children and the home front to ensuring adequate support for Middle East returnees, women have to deal with these issues on a day to day basis. They struggle with economic and social issues. When all the political ha hoo has died down after the 17th, these issues will still exist for millions of Sri Lankan women. Are they going to be able to deal with those better because of the women who would have been elected to parliament by then?

The women in parliament can start with a major issue before going any further. They can attempt to make an attitude change towards women. They can start in the parliament itself – initiate change in how women are perceived in society. Take a bus ride and educate the commuters on why sexual molestation in buses is rampant and must be stopped because it violates the rights of women travelers. Encourage women to come out with their stories of abuse and rape so that the perpetrators can be dealt with. Ensure the gaps are closed in gender discrimination and abuse. Close the doors to the powerful politicos who abuse the system for their own ends. The list is endless but we can start somewhere.

Or will these women who are now seeking our vote forget the female voter once they are in? What all those seeking re-entry or first time entry to parliament must understand is that the voter of today is one who is very different from the one whom they faced at the previous general election. January 08th heralded in a new age for the Sri Lankan voter ; today, we know what is going on. Thanks to new technology and social media, voters cannot be duped anymore with fancy stories and promises from the skies. The facts cannot be concealed anymore – citizen journalists are empowered with their camera phones and nothing goes unrecorded. The politicians seeking the votes must understand this fact – unless and until they do, they are not likely to win. On the brighter side, they can now engage more efficiently almost one to one with the voters on social media. They can truly make a change that we can take note of.

The women contesting on behalf of all political parties must include women on their agenda – they will not have my vote until they do and I’m sure they should not have yours. We no longer believe nor trust in empty promises that sound wonderful but lacks the credibility of a plan that backs it up.

So, let me know – what plans have you, female politician, for us women?

A requiem for Wassim “Wassa” Thajudeen – Esto Perpetua

A requiem for Wassim “Wassa” Thajudeen – Esto Perpetua

At the school by the sea, the boys are introduced to sports at an early age.

The Thomians like to stress on their balanced education system, one in which sports and knowledge go hand in hand in order to build the personality of young men walking the hallowed portals of learning at Mount Lavinia.

My son, now 17, switched to rowing later on but at STC, he started rugby early on. Rugby is a Thomian passion, one they take very seriously. For the ruggerites of STC, it is more than a sport ; they live and love the game during and after the season. Wassim Thajudeen was no exception – he was a fine young player who showed much promise. In true Thomian fashion, he cared not for false bravado displays of so called false princes, true pretenders to a throne that seemed very real at the time. In the end, that was too much for the demons who could not stand his unspoken dominance, his talent, his capability on the rugby field.  Wassim “Wassa” Thajudeen, as he was affectionately known among his fellow Thomians, was a true blue “Preppite”, a boy from the STC Colpetty, my son tells me, and was indeed much loved.

I can understand that very well. At S.Thomas’, the boys didn’t know each other by their religion, cast or creed but by the fellowship they shared among a brotherhood of Sinhalese, Tamils and Moslems, Christians, Buddhists and Hindus. It never occurred to them to divide their fellow students among ethnic or religious lines.How so unlike the false royal family and its bunch of rogues.

In Wassa, S. Thomas – and Sri Lanka lost a fine young rugby player who would have had a stellar career had he been allowed to live. In retrospect, we realise that we as a nation lived through such dark times that only the mercy of his Allah and my God could have seen us through. Today, as his mother still mourns the untimely loss of her beloved son, I can understand her pain. When you lose your son, you lose your world. And it is never the same again.

The fact that he was tortured and murdered has always been known albeit limited to the circles of Colombo’s dinner circuits – it was a whispered secret that today, is loud enough to be heard in the highest portals of justice. Yet no one dared to point fingers back then. Unless one wanted a free ride in a white van, never to return. But today, thanks be to God, it is different. We can take comfort in knowing that justice has come full circle. For Wassa and the many others whose lives were cruelly snatched during those cursed years of Rajapakse rule, there will be justice. That’s what Good Governance is all about.

Back in the day, I recall telling myself that this, too shall pass.

And it did. On January 08th 2015 – who can forget the sense of liberation and freedom of waking up to a Sri Lanka finally free of the Rajapakse curse.  As we stand on the threshold of yet another election, one that seeks to bring back the demons of injustice, murder, we would do well to remember his death and the deaths of countless others murdered during those long and dark Rajapakse years. Their blood, spilled long before their time and spilled in the most inhumane manner imaginable, cries out for justice.

All mothers still yearn for their little boys inside their grown sons – Wassa’s mother would have been no different. In her heart, I’m sure she still can hear his laughter, his little foot steps echo in the hall way. And what pain it must be to have to live through it. Losing a child is a lifelong nightmare. And there is a lesson for us all in that nightmare.

We owe a responsibility to Wassim Thajudeen, Prageeth Eknaligods and all those brave Sri Lankans whose deaths must not be in vain – we as a nation must ensure they are given peace in death, that justice is done as we head for the polls on the 17th. Let their murders be avenged with the perpetrators brought to justice. That should be our vision – and our goal on the 17th August 2015.

Evil men do not understand justice, But those who seek the Lord understand all things.Proverbs 28 – 5 – The Bible

“God commands justice and fair dealing…” – Quran 16:90