divided we stand..

divided we stand..

 

My son’s good friend Hameed Zahran passed away tragically around this time last year.

His friends mourned him across religious and ethnic divides.

It never occurred to them – or to my son that this was a Moslem who died. He was their friend, the boy next door who strummed his guitar and sang out loud during breaks. The first one to volunteer for anything.

He will stay in their memories that way.

For years, I have sworn by my daughter’s Paeditrician  the trusted Dr Azyan Shafik, a student of late Dr Stella who was a legend and a stalwart in Sri Lankan paediatrics.

It has never occurred to me or to anyone of us that he is a Moslem.

Whenever we are in the mood for well prepared, tasty biriyani, we look no further than the trusty old Majestic Hotel. The owner is a Moslem,  but it has never ever occurred to me to question his faith before tucking into the delicious rice.

Often enough, we order sawaans from Moslem owned eateries – mostly because they are easy to serve and often suffice for big groups of guests.

No, we don’t wonder about the religious beliefs of the eatery owners.

A step further, when Thajudeen was mourned across the divide as a clear case of misconstrued justice for a human being, I don’t recall anyone mentioning his faith.

Why has it suddenly become a dangerous factor that is forcing us to pause and take stock if ethnicity or as in this case, a religious group, is something to be worried about.

Having recovered from years of blood shed and mayhem, if anything I want to teach my children as Sri Lankans, is to think Sri Lankan. Not to be limited to a time or a space that calls for narrow straight jacketed thinking that smacks of insecurity and bias.  To even think that someone in the orbit of tomorrow must consider a person’s religious or ethnicity before his or her qualities as a human being, should be worrisome to us all.

Hear me out here – yes, there are extremists on both sides.

As there always are. But the majority of Sri Lankans, whether Moslem, Sinhalese, Tamil or Burgher , are not and are only happy to lead their lives and mind their business.

If a nation can be governed through insecurity gnawing away inside about a particular ethnic or a religious group who could be positioned as a threat, then we have learnt nothing from our deeply scarring experiences with the 30 year old war. We have only burdened the next generation with prejudice, colouring their world view for good.

We are no longer in isolation today. We are a part of the vibrant international community, whose larger than life presence on social media can pick up vibes in seconds and form opinions without facts.

We have opted to forget that in such a interlinked world, no ethnic or a religious group can stick to their corner and cry wolf. It doesn’t work that way. If someone can play on your insecurity, then you have not evolved much.

When we shop or hunt for bargains, we don’t choose to dwell on the shop owner’s ethnicity.  When we choose a product or a service, the religious affiliations or the ethnicity of the owners, often does not come into play. We choose what we want. It really doesn’t matter.

Some of Sri Lanka’s biggest and best known companies which employ thousands of Sri Lankans of all ethnicity and religions, are owned by Moslems. There are Moslems working side by side with fellow Lankans in companies owned by Sinhalese.

Matters not to anyone to question the ethnicity or the religious affiliations of the owners when applying for a job.

Where would we go if we give in to extremists? Where would our children be able to come together as a nation to go past the mistakes and the mishaps we have come through as a nation, to celebrate unity in diversity?

My son schooled at the great school by the sea, S. Thomas College Mount Lavinia where he learnt the best lesson of all – getting along with all shades of fellow Lankans. Although a Christian school, STC was a great place that brought together Sri Lankans of all faiths and ethnicity. Even today, my son and his class mates do not see themselves through the coloured lens of ethnicity and religion – but as Sri Lankans of Generation Z.

That should be the goal of us all.

 

 

 

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When the scars remind you of the battle ..pick up the pieces and move on..

When the scars remind you of the battle ..pick up the pieces and move on..

What do you do when you go to pieces?

What do you do when your world collapses – in one earth shattering moment?

Sometimes it is the last thing you had in mind. At other times, it is what you thought would never happen to you. All the same, when your sanity lies on the edge, mutilated and wounded, your sense of balance is gone and you just sit there wondering what happened, it is that moment that you come face to face with yourself.

Not the you who faced the flak. Not the you that went to pieces – but the you who overcame the odds and survived.

We are all survivors, one way or another.

For some of us, it has been a process – sometimes easy at other times tough yet a process all the same. Yet, there are others who never recover. Who may live for years with the emotional trauma of it all.

Recovery has to be self-willed. There’s no other way around it.

If you are waiting for someone to come and help you pinpoint the pain and somehow magically, take it all away, you are dreaming.

The will to do something about it starts and ends with you.

You choose to overcome. You choose to learn from what happened and move on.

In short, you choose to pick up the pieces and move on. Apply the lessons you learned. Forgive those who hurt you. Forget – if possible – what happened.

The scars that heal over time are there to remind you that you fought the battle.

That you survived  – not because that is what people do. But because that’s what you chose to do.

You chose to wear your scars as lessons. Lessons that teach you about the treachery, the betrayal, the sheer folly of living life. There will always be those who will be the bad guys. Yet the good guys have survived and always will.

Battle scarred doesn’t mean defeat. It means that you have become stronger, better because of those scars. Scars often help us overcome the odds – to remind ourselves that we fought the battle and yes, we were wounded but what matters is that we survived.

Change your perspective. Sometimes, the worldview we hold is often at the ground level – go higher. One step, yes but maybe two. A higher perspective often calls for a better view. You would see what you didn’t – couldn’t see at ground level. That somehow, it would all be okay.

All survivors have fought battles – sometimes within, sometimes outside. Often, they have had to fight the fifth column – the enemy within. But the important thing is that they have overcome.

Did you know that there is a winner living inside you – beneath all the heartache, the pain, the betrayal? That the winner can emerge just the same way that a caterpillar became a butterfly.

So, if you that survivor, move on. You can. You will.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Champions of humility..

Champions of humility..

Hope comes in all forms and all norms.

On Sunday the 03rd of April, it came to a team considered the under dogs in a hotly contested cricket tournament that had millions glued to their TV screens throughout the cricket mad world.

Darren Sammy who led the team from the Caribbean to the Finals against England, held in Eden Garden Stadium Kolkata, proved to the world that he was a man of his word. He believed in a victory when others doubted their ability to win cricket’s most prestigious crown currently. He believed in God – a devout Christian like most of his team mates, a fact he was proud to declare following their stunning win over England. He had nothing but praise for the boys who made it all possible. He had hope – not just a flicker, but the kind of hope that brims over and infects others around him.

Darren Sammy showed the world that nothing is hopeless until and unless you have taken it head on. Hope is what drives us human beings to achieve stellar success – it is the essential ingredient that keeps human spirit going even when everything else around you, as the poet said, is ready to quit.In the case of the men from the Caribbean, they had plenty of it going around. They never vacated their posts at being masters of hope. And it paid off.

The West Indian team also championed a greater cause. They were the happy-go-lucky team, always smiling, sharing a close sense of camaraderie all around. In a sense, they had perfected the art of having fun despite all the seriousness of winning cricket’s coveted title. They replaced the fun factor that seemed to have gone out from the game, with big bucks taking over and more and more strategic moves wrought with seriousness that belies the joy of playing a sport for the love of it.

Darren and the boys also gave a master lesson in humility that night. They were not just the unexpected champions but they were also humble as they dedicated their win to their fans back home. The cricket pundits had not expected them to rise up to the challenge of entering the Finals and stand tall enough to win. As Darren himself told the world in a speech packed with emotion, they were called no brainers at one stage – they had a point to prove. They knew they were champions inside. The world got to see it at the right time, the right way. When you know and believe that you have within you what it takes to be a champion, not even the world’s biggest and the best heavyweights can stand in your way.

The West Indies cricket team inspired us all with their win. Their victory affirmed that it is not always the most expected, the most favoured, the most likely that win. That there is always room, just enough, for hope to triumph amidst adversity. That tomorrow belongs to those who believe in their ability to rise above the tide.

May Darren and his team go on to inspire hundreds of youth in the Caribbean and elsewhere to give their very best.